Chuck Brooks

Chuck Brooks, columnist, is the Principal Market Growth Strategist for General Dynamics Mission Systems for Cybersecurity and Emerging Technologies. Chuck is also Adjunct Faculty in Georgetown University’s Graduate Applied Intelligence program. He is an Advisor and Contributor to Cognitive World. In his full time role he is the Principal Market Growth Strategist for General Dynamics Mission Systems for Cybersecurity and Emerging Technologies. LinkedIn named Chuck as one of “The Top 5 Tech People to Follow on LinkedIn” out of their 550 million members. He is also an advisor to LinkedIn on cybersecurity and emerging technology issues. In both 2017 and 2016, he was named “Cybersecurity Marketer of the Year by the Cybersecurity Excellence Awards. He is also a Cybersecurity Expert for “The Network” at the Washington Post, Visiting Editor at Homeland Security Today, and Executive Editor of a forthcoming Newsweek publication on cybersecurity and artificial intelligence. Chuck’s professional industry affiliations include being the Chairman of CompTIA’s New and Emerging Technology Committee, as a member of The AFCEA Cybersecurity Committee, and as member of the Electrical and Electronics Engineers IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Working Group. Some of Chuck’s other activities include being a Subject Matter Expert to The Homeland Defense and Security Information Analysis Center (HDIAC), a Department of Defense (DoD) sponsored organization through the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), as a featured presenter at USTRANSCOM on cybersecurity threats to transportation, as a featured presenter to the FBI and the National Academy of Sciences on Life Sciences Cybersecurity.

He is an Advisory Board Member for The Center for Advancing Innovation, and was also appointed as a Technology Partner Advisor to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He has served as the lead Judge for the 2014,15,16 and17 Government Security News Homeland Security News Awards evaluating top security technologies. In government, Chuck has received two senior Presidential appointments. Under President George W. Bush Chuck was appointed to The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as the first Legislative Director of The Science & Technology Directorate at the Department of Homeland Security. He also was appointed as Special Assistant to the Director of Voice of America under President Reagan. He served as a top Advisor to the late Senator Arlen Specter on Capitol Hill covering security and technology issues on Capitol Hill. In local government he also worked as an Auxiliary Police officer for Arlington, Virginia. In industry, Chuck has served in senior executive roles for Xerox as Vice President & Client Executive for Homeland Security, for Rapiscan and Vice President of R & D, for SRA as Vice President of Government Relations, and for Sutherland as Vice President of Marketing and Government Relations. He was also Vice President of Federal R & D for Rapiscan Systems. In media, Chuck is the featured Homeland Security contributor for Federal Times, featured cybersecurity contributor for High Performance Counsel on cybersecurity, and an advisor and contributor to Cognitive World, a leading publication on artificial intelligence. He has also appeared in Forbes and Huffington Post and has published more than 150 articles and blogs on cybersecurity, homeland security and technology issues. He has 45,000 followers on LinkedIn and runs a dozen LI groups, including the two largest in homeland security. In academia, Chuck is Adjunct Faculty at Georgetown University teaching a course in homeland security risk management. He was an Adjunct Faculty Member at Johns Hopkins University where he taught a graduate course on homeland security for two years. He has an MA in International relations from the University of Chicago, a BA in Political Science from DePauw University, and a Certificate in International Law from The Hague Academy of International Law.

Articles

A Scoville Heat Scale For Measuring Cybersecurity

A Scoville Heat Scale For Measuring Cybersecurity


By Chuck Brooks  |  September 19, 2018  |  CogWorld on FORBES


The Scoville Scale is a measurement chart used to rate the heat of peppers or other spicy foods. It can also can have a useful application for measuring cybersecurity threats. Cyber-threats are also red hot as the human attack surface is projected to reach over 6 billion people by 2022. In addition, cyber-crime damage costs are estimated to reach $6 trillion annually by 2021. The cybersecurity firm RiskIQ states that every minute approximately 1,861 people fall victim to cyber-attacks, while some $1.14 million is stolen. In recognition of these alarming stats, perhaps it would be useful to categorize cyber-threats in a similar scale to the hot peppers we consume.

I have provided my own Scoville Scale-like heat characterizations of the cyber threats we are facing below.


Scoville Scale of cyber threatsData Breaches: According to Juniper Research, over The Next 5 Years, 146 Billion Records Will Be Breached. The 2017 Annual Data Breach Year-end Review (Identity Theft Resource Center) found that 1,946,181,599 of records containing personal and other sensitive data that have been in compromised between Jan. 1, 2017, and March 20, 2018. The true tally of victims is likely much greater as many breaches go unreported. According to the Pew Research Center, a majority of Americans (65%) have already personally experienced a major data breach.  On the Scoville scale, data breaches, by the nature of their growing exponential threat can be easily categorized at a “Ghost Pepper” level.

Malware: According to Forrester Research’s 2017 global security survey, there are 430 million types of malware online—up 40 percent from just three years ago. The Malware Tech Blog cited that 100,000 groups in at least 150 countries and more than 400,000 machines were infected by the Wannacry virus in 2017, at a total cost of around $4 billion. Malware is ubiquitous and we deal with it. It is a steady “Jalepeno Pepper” on the scale.

Ransomware:  Cybersecurity Ventures predicts that ransomware damage costs will rise to $11.5 billion in 2019 with an attack occurring every 14 seconds. According to McAfee Lab's Threat Report covering Q4 2017, eight new malware samples were recorded every second during the final three months of 2017. Cisco finds that Ransomware attacks are growing more than 350 percent annually. Experts estimate that there are more than 125 separate families of ransomware and hackers have become very adept at hiding malicious code. Ransomware is scary and there is reason to panic, seems like a ”Fatali Pepper.”

Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS):   In 2016, DDoS attacks were launched against a Domain Name System (DNS) called Dyn. The attack directed thousands of IoT connected devices to overload and take out internet platforms and services.  The attack used a simple exploit of a default password to target home surveillance cameras, and routers. DDoS is like a “Trinidad Pepper” as it can do quick massive damage and stop commerce cold. DDoS is particularly a frightening scenario for the retail, financial. and healthcare communities.

Phishing:  Phishing is a tool to infect malware, ransomware, and DDoS. The 2017 Ponemon State of Endpoint Security Risk Report found that 56% of organizations in a survey of 1,300 IT decision makers identified targeted phishing attacks as their biggest current cybersecurity threat. According to an analysis by Health Information Privacy/Security Alert, 46,000 new phishing sites are created every day. According to Webroot, An average of 1.385 million new, unique phishing sites are created each month. The bottom line it is easy anyone to be fooled by a targeted phish. No one is invulnerable to a crafty spear-phish, especially the C-Suite. On the Scoville Scale, Phishing is prolific, persistent, and often causes harm. I rate it at the “Habanero Pepper” level.

Protecting The Internet of Things:  The task of securing IoT is increasingly more difficult as mobility, connectivity and the cyber surface attack space grows. Most analysts conclude that there will be more than 20 billion connected Internet devices by 2020. According to a study conducted in April of 2017 by The Altman Vilandrie & Company, neary half of U.S. firms using The Internet of Things experienced cybersecurity breaches.  Last year, Symantec noted that IoT attacks were up 600 percent. Analysts predict 25 percent of cyber-attacks in 2020 will target IoT environments. Protect IoT can be the “Carolina Reaper” as everything connected is vulnerable and the consequences can be devastating.

Lack of Skilled Cybersecurity Workers: Both the public and private sectors are facing major challenges from a dearth of cybersecurity talent. As companies evolve toward digital business, people with cybersecurity skills are becoming more difficult to find and more expensive for companies to hire and keepA report out from Cybersecurity Ventures estimates there will be 3.5 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs by 2021. A 2017 research project by the industry analyst firm Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG ) and the Information Systems Security Association (ISSA) found that 70 percent of cybersecurity professionals claimed their organization was impacted by the cybersecurity skills shortage. On the Scoville Scale, I rate the skills shortage as a “Scotch Bonett,” dangerous but perhaps automation, machine learning and artificial intelligence can ease the pain.

Insider Threats: Insider threats can impact a company’s operational capabilities, cause significant financial damages, and harm a reputation. The IBM Cyber Security Index found that 60% of all cyber- attacks were carried out by insiders.  And according to  a recent Accenture HfS Research report 69% of enterprise security executives reported experiencing an attempted theft or corruption of data by insiders over one year. Malicious insider intrusions can involve theft of IP, social engineering; spear-phishing attacks, malware, ransomware, and in some cases sabotage. Often overlooked, insider threats correlate to a “Red Savina Habanero.”

Identity Theft: Nearly 60 million Americans have been affected by identity theft, according to a 2018 online survey by The Harris Poll. The reason for the increased rate of identity fraud is clear. As we become more and more connected, the more visible and vulnerable we become to those who want to hack our accounts and steal our identities. We are often enticed via social media or email phishing. Digital fraud and stealing of our identities is all too common and associated closely to data breaches, a “Chocolate Habanero.”

Crypto-mining and Theft:  Crypto poses relatively new threats to the cybersecurity ecosystem. Hackers need computing power to find and “mine” for coins and can hijack your computer processor while you are online. Hackers place algorithm scripts on popular websites that people innocently visit.  You might not even know you are being hijacked.  Trend Micro disclosed that Crypto-mining malware detections jumped 956% in the first half of 2018 versus the whole of last year. Also, paying ransomware in crypto currencies seems to be a growing trend. The recent WannaCry and the Petya ransomware attackers demanded payment in bitcoin. On The Scoville Scale, it’s still early for crypto and the threats may evolve but right now a “Tabasco Pepper.”

Potential Remedies: Cybersecurity at its core essence is guided by risk management: people, process, policies, and technologies. Nothing is completely invulnerable, but there are some potential remedies that can help us navigate the increasingly malicious cyber threat landscape. Some of these include:

  • Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
  • Automation and Adaptive Networks
  • Biometrics and Authentication Technologies
  • Blockchain
  • Cloud Computing
  • Cryptography/Encryption
  • Cyber-hygiene
  • Cyber Insurance
  • Incident Response Plans
  • Information Threat Sharing
  • Managed Security Services
  • Predictive Analytics
  • Quantum-computing and Super-Computing
  • And … Cold Milk

The bottom line is that as we try to keep pace with rising cybersecurity threat levels, we are all going to get burned in one way or another. But we can be prepared and resilient to help mitigate the fire. Keeping track of threats on any sale can be useful toward those goals.


 

Track

Emerging Tech Impacting the Security Industry

Emerging Tech Impacting the Security Industry


By Chuck Brooks  |  September 27, 2018  |  Source: CogWorld on FORBES


Emerging technologies are already affecting how we live and work. They're also changing how we approach, plan and integrate security operations. With the advent of artificial intelligence, robotics, quantum computing, the Internet of Things, augmented reality, materials science, 3-D printing, and data analytics, the security industry is being transformed.

Certainly, we are living in an era where innovation, agility and imagination are all essential in order to keep pace with the exponential technological transformation taking place. For security, both physical and cyber, the equation is the same catalyzing many new potential applications for emerging technologies.

Some applied verticals in homeland security where I personally see emerging technologies are making an impact include:

  • Counter terrorism and law enforcement informatics via predictive analytics and artificial intelligence

  • Real-time horizon scanning and data mining for threats and information sharing

  • Automated cybersecurity and information assurance

  • Enhanced Surveillance (chemical and bio detection sensors, cameras, drones, facial recognition, license plate readers)

  • Simulation and augmented reality technologies for training and modeling

  • New non-lethal technologies such as: acoustics systems, chemicals markers, communications systems, entanglement systems, optical devices, non-penetrating projectiles and munitions

  • Safety and security equipment (including bullet and bomb proof) made with lighter and stronger materials

  • Advanced forensics enabled by enhanced computing capabilities (including future quantum computing)

  • Interoperable communications, soon to be bolstered by 5G for First Responders

  • Situational awareness capabilities via GPS for disaster response and crisis response scenarios

  • Biometrics: assured identity security screening solutions by bio-signature: (every aspect of your physiology can be used as a bio-signature. Measure unique heart/pulse rates, electrocardiogram sensor, blood oximetry, skin temperature)

  • Robotic Policing (already happening in Dubai!)

That is my own emerging homeland security technologies short list. There is much more to add. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) has many projects and technology solutions that affect the Homeland Security mission. There are a variety of amazing innovations and products in key DHS mission areas, such as aviation security, border security, cyber security, and first responder capabilities.

New technologies are also being commercialized by technology foraging. The Department of Homeland Security defines technology foraging as a process of “identifying, locating and evaluating existing or developing technologies, products, services and emerging trends. This approach allows faster development and increases partnership opportunities and resources to assist the development of current or future homeland security systems and needs.”

DHS is not alone in bringing emerging security to stakeholders. The Department of Defense (DOD), through the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), is the progenitor of many technologies beyond imagination. As the DoD’s primary innovation engine, DARPA undertakes projects that are finite in duration but that create lasting revolutionary change.” Some of DARPA’s recent projects include deep dives into security applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning. 

The Intelligence Community is also active in tech foraging. The Intelligence Advanced Research Project Activity (IARPA) has cybersecurity research focus areas that include information assurance, advanced computing technologies and architectures, quantum information science and technology, and threat detection and mitigation.

The DOE National Labs and Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC’s) are also very involved in developing security technologies. These include some of our nation’s most recognized national Labs including Lawrence Livermore, Oak Ridge, Argonne, Sandia, Idaho National laboratory, Battelle, and Brookhaven. The benefits of the Labs’ role include experienced capability in rapid prototyping of new technologies ready for transitioning, showcasing and commercialization.

As in most emerging technology endeavors, the public and private sectors are working partners in funding research and development, and creating foundries and innovation centers to build and market these emerging security technologies. There is still much to be discovered, tested, prototyped and employed in protecting us from future threats. Security technologies can be enablers in helping prevent and mitigate acts of terrorism, pandemics and natural disasters. Accordingly, the security industry is being transformed for those missions.


Chuck Brooks is the Principal Market Growth Strategist for General Dynamics Mission Systems for Cybersecurity and Emerging Technologies. Chuck is also Adjunct Faculty in Georgetown University’s Graduate Applied Intelligence program. He is an Advisor and Contributor to Cognitive World. In his full time role he is the Principal Market Growth Strategist for General Dynamics Mission Systems for Cybersecurity and Emerging Technologies. LinkedIn named Chuck as one of “The Top 5 Tech People to Follow on LinkedIn” out of their 550 million members. He is also an advisor to LinkedIn on cybersecurity and emerging technology issues. In both 2017 and 2016, he was named “Cybersecurity Marketer of the Year by the Cybersecurity Excellence Awards. He is also a Cybersecurity Expert for “The Network” at the Washington Post, Visiting Editor at Homeland Security Today, and Executive Editor of a forthcoming Newsweek publication on cybersecurity and artificial intelligence. Chuck’s professional industry affiliations include being the Chairman of CompTIA’s New and Emerging Technology Committee, as a member of The AFCEA Cybersecurity Committee, and as member of the Electrical and Electronics Engineers IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Working Group. Some of Chuck’s other activities include being a Subject Matter Expert to The Homeland Defense and Security Information Analysis Center (HDIAC), a Department of Defense (DoD) sponsored organization through the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), as a featured presenter at USTRANSCOM on cybersecurity threats to transportation, as a featured presenter to the FBI and the National Academy of Sciences on Life Sciences Cybersecurity.

He is an Advisory Board Member for The Center for Advancing Innovation, and was also appointed as a Technology Partner Advisor to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He has served as the lead Judge for the 2014,15,16 and17 Government Security News Homeland Security News Awards evaluating top security technologies. In government, Chuck has received two senior Presidential appointments. Under President George W. Bush Chuck was appointed to The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as the first Legislative Director of The Science & Technology Directorate at the Department of Homeland Security. He also was appointed as Special Assistant to the Director of Voice of America under President Reagan. He served as a top Advisor to the late Senator Arlen Specter on Capitol Hill covering security and technology issues on Capitol Hill. In local government he also worked as an Auxiliary Police officer for Arlington, Virginia. In industry, Chuck has served in senior executive roles for Xerox as Vice President & Client Executive for Homeland Security, for Rapiscan and Vice President of R & D, for SRA as Vice President of Government Relations, and for Sutherland as Vice President of Marketing and Government Relations. He was also Vice President of Federal R & D for Rapiscan Systems. In media, Chuck is the featured Homeland Security contributor for Federal Times, featured cybersecurity contributor for High Performance Counsel on cybersecurity, and an advisor and contributor to Cognitive World, a leading publication on artificial intelligence. He has also appeared in Forbes and Huffington Post and has published more than 150 articles and blogs on cybersecurity, homeland security and technology issues. He has 45,000 followers on LinkedIn and runs a dozen LI groups, including the two largest in homeland security. In academia, Chuck is Adjunct Faculty at Georgetown University teaching a course in homeland security risk management. He was an Adjunct Faculty Member at Johns Hopkins University where he taught a graduate course on homeland security for two years. He has an MA in International relations from the University of Chicago, a BA in Political Science from DePauw University, and a Certificate in International Law from The Hague Academy of International Law.


 

 

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The Search for Extraterrestrial Life Rapidly Advancing with Discoveries of Earth-like Planets

The Search for Extraterrestrial Life Rapidly Advancing with Discoveries of Earth-like Planets


By Chuck Brooks  |  November 20, 2017


As our technology has become more sophisticated, so has the search for other potential life in the universe. Some NASA scientists are now estimating that we may have contact with extraterrestrial contact in as little 25 years.

Last year, scientists announced the discovery of a planet, a red dwarf 12.36 light years away; only four light years away from Earth located in the Alpha Centauri system. The planet is called Proxima Centauri, and it may be habitable. This discovery, along with recent discoveries of other potential exoplanets that can harbor life has led many leading astronomers to come to the conclusion that we likely are not alone in the universe.

Just last week, A team of researchers just used the European Southern Observatory’s (ESO’s) High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) to discover a low-mass alien planet orbiting the red dwarf star Ross 128 just 11 light years away from our solar system. What makes this notable is this planet has a mass that is similar to Earth’s.


Seti


A project aimed at listening for signals of other intelligent life, SETI (Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence), has been active for several years analyzing signals from outer space of intelligent sourcing. A spin-off of the SETI project is called METI (Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is focused on designing and transmitting messages to possible life-bearing planets. METI Project Scientists recently transmitted a signal to a relatively nearby star called Luyten’s Star (GJ 273). The signal sent to Luyten’s Star incorporates “a scientific and mathematical “tutorial,'” as well as 33 short musical compositions by artists in the Sónar community, according to Space.com.


hello, universe


Some new factors to consider based on advanced radio telescopes and on Kepler data, (Kepler is a space observatory launched by NASA to discover Earth-size planets orbiting other stars), is that habitable exoplanets similar to Earth are much more common than originally thought, and the universe is more expansive than we have believed. We are learning more each day and NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, planning to launch between March and June 2019, will exponentially add to our understanding.

Scientists from UC Berkeley and the University of Hawaii issued a study that 22 percent of sun-like stars may harbor planets roughly the size of Earth in their habitable zones that have been overlooked because these planets are harder to detect. One of the study’s co-authors, Andrew Howard, stated “With about 100 billion stars in our Milky Way galaxy, that’s about 20 billion such planets … That’s a few Earth-sized planets for every human being on the planet Earth.” Read about Earth-like exoplanets.

The estimates of potential earth-like planets vary among astronomers and exobiologists (those who study extraterrestrial life). NASA estimates conclude that there are probably more than 100 billion Earth-like planets based on the assumption that our universe has 500 billion billion stars similar to our own. That figure contemplates nearly identical conditions for life to evolve on these planets. Evidence derived from new powerful telescopes, including Kepler’s exploration of the Milky Way and various space probes in our own solar system, have shown that the water is more common place that thought and the organic building blocks of life are abundant.


These estimates are generally based upon a formula of probability created by astronomer Dr. Frank Drake in 1961. His “Drake Equation” sought to arrive at an estimate of the number of active, communicative extraterrestrial civilizations in the Milky Way galaxy. It was based on:

N = The number of civilizations in The Milky Way Galaxy whose electromagnetic emissions are detectable.

R* = The rate of formation of stars suitable for the development of intelligent life.

fp = The fraction of those stars with planetary systems.

ne = The number of planets, per solar system, with an environment suitable for life.

fl = The fraction of suitable planets on which life actually appears.

fi = The fraction of life bearing planets on which intelligent life emerges.

fc = The fraction of civilizations that develop a technology that releases detectable signs of their existence into space.

L = The length of time such civilizations release detectable signals into space.


Drake Equation


In addition to radio telescope scanning, analytics in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence is significantly improving. A new capability based upon machine learning and artificial intelligence was created by researchers at the University of Toronto Scarborough, Canada. The computing capability is believed to be up to 1,000 times faster at predicting whether a planet is potentially habitable. Researchers will also use the AI tool to study NASA's impending Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) which is set to launch in 2018.

Beyond the Milky Way, The numbers of planets that could support life, as we know it, are really mind-boggling. Astronomers at the University of Auckland claim that there are actually around 100 billion habitable, Earth-like planets in the Milky Way. Multiplied by the 500 billion plus galaxies in the universe, they estimate around 50,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (5×1022) habitable planets, or 50 sextillion in the universe. Of course, forms of life that could potentially evolve without Earth eco-systems would exponentially change that estimate to even a greater number.

There are a variety of projects dedicated to the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) now scanning space with sensitive optical and acoustic technologies. Also, Gravitational Microlensing is being used for detection of planets using techniques measuring the bending of light emitted by a star as a result of gravity from orbiting objects.

There are those who say with all the possibilities of life out there – where is it and why have we not yet discovered it? This is commonly called the “Fermi Paradox” noting the contradiction between the high probability that life that is predicted to be in our universe, and the lack of evidence that advanced life exists anywhere else but Earth. But as such a young civilization that only discovered electricity in a recent era, there is not really much of a paradox. We are just at the doorstep of exploration and cannot not expect to know what we do not know yet. Man’s real quest for the stars has really just begun.

As mankind’s technology (especially artificial intelligence) and computing capabilities continue to grow, so will our ability to explore in greater detail the expansiveness of space and the multitude of galaxies. What was yesterday’s science fiction is now today’s reality. Someday, we may even have the capacity to travel beyond our dreams as humans, perhaps as cyborgs or replicating robotic probes. The continued discovery of Earth-like planets in our galaxy and beyond is another small step in our pondering of an understanding of what may be out there as we peer among the night sky.
 



Chuck Brooks is President of Brooks Consulting International. LinkedIn named Chuck as one of “The Top 5 Tech People to Follow on LinkedIn” out of their 500 million members. He has published more than 150 articles and blogs on cybersecurity and technology issues. In both 2017 and 2016, he was named “Cybersecurity Marketer of the Year by the Cybersecurity Excellence Awards. Chuck’s professional industry affiliations include being the Chairman of CompTIA’s New and Emerging Technology Committee, and as a member of The AFCEA Cybersecurity Committee. In government, Chuck has served at The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as the first Legislative Director of The Science & Technology Directorate at the Department of Homeland Security. He served as a top Advisor to the late Senator Arlen Specter on Capitol Hill covering security and technology issues on Capitol Hill. In academia, Chuck was an Adjunct Faculty Member at Johns Hopkins University where he taught a graduate course on homeland security for two years. He has an MA in International relations from the University of Chicago, a BA in Political Science from DePauw University, and a Certificate in International Law from The Hague Academy of International Law.

 

Trends In Emerging Cognitive Technologies and Predictive Analytics

Trends In Emerging Cognitive Technologies and Predictive Analytics


By Chuck Brooks   |  March 24, 2018


An interview with Gabby Menachem, CEO of Loom Systems, named by Gartner as a “Cool Vendor” in Artificial Intelligence


  1. Beyond the hype, what are the perils and promises of emerging cognitive technologies? More specifically, are artificial intelligence and machine learning something to fear or cultivate? 

That's a great question that I encounter a lot, and I think it's also being fostered a lot by media and popular science. For example, the late Stephen Hawking has been a passionate advocate of the "AI will destroy humanity as we know it" theme, with the apocalyptic prediction that AI “could spell the end of the human race.”

But I think there's a huge and very common misconception on the meta-question of the 'Man vs. Machine' dispute, where I believe that should not be our focal point at all, rather we should be talking about a man and machine convergence, enabling each entity to maximize its potential and achieve things that alone cannot be done. Cognitive technologies can dramatically empower humanity to get ahead and make immense progress in a very wide range of areas. We simply need to get rid of fear and bias, which can be done through education.

The biggest promise I see in cognitive technology today is with intelligent automation. In many cases we encounter repetitive tasks done by humans since machines are hard to program to make decisions on unknown data. Examples span from smart filtering in recycling through Cyber defense, where in the latter the knowledge base that need to be applied to context is the hardest to put in software.

Building cognitive technologies enables this layer of intelligence which will ultimately lead to a higher degree of automation and easier application development – this is very exciting!
 

  1. In a data driven world, how fast is the industry moving toward cognitive recognition and automation and how will it impact our way of life?

In the past few years we've been seeing immense advancements in automations that span across every industry out there, and I think it's fascinating what cognitive sciences in general can do for entire verticals.

With the rise of big data in the last decade, data driven decision making and probability thinking is growing as a field with data scientist job demand. As the industry grows, we see that the shortage in human capital is not only a consequence of education focus, but mainly of skill and experience applying the academic methods to real life problems.

This is why in many cases the first place for cognitive recognition and automation is incorporating the methodologies of data science to big data – mimicking the thought process a human would do looking at the same data but with the diligence and speed of a computer.

The industry is applying this to use cases in different methods – from deep learning to rule based systems with changing parameters, but this is only the surface of what can be achieved. The future of cognitive computing will make decision making and knowledge systems use much easier and will empower humans in their day to day.
 

  1. Intelligent insights combined with real-time predictive analytics have taken the center stage in digital transformation. Can you offer a primer on the capabilities of both machine learning and artificial intelligence in play roles in this transformation? 

The digital transformation impact is in its infancy. As the industry focus on the value of data derived from digital processes increases, we will see more intelligent use cases for ML and AI.
 

Today we see machine learning and AI applied to areas of customer interaction – like understanding customer behavior and trends automatically to optimize delivery, through customer experience – where ML and AI are used to track every customer journey and offer assistance or signal technical resources when a customer needs help, and last to internal operations, where the technology helps in optimizing performance and self-service by understanding the needs of employees.
 

The two areas I see AI play a huge role in 2018 are surfacing unknown patterns in data and solving the skills gap needed to address this new knowledge or insight. The capabilities around these problems are very well established in terms of technology, though a lot of work is to be done in packaging these capabilities to solve customer experience issues.

As AI adoption grows, I believe intelligent insights combined with predictive analytics will help drive the industry’s applications as this is where value is created from data we already collect and is the next step in capturing the value from this evolution.
 

  1. Against the backdrop of an increasingly interconnected world, with a growing attack surface of the Internet of Things, are there ways that artificial intelligence and machine learning help us be more cyber secure? 

Machine learning is already being used to detect anomalies in large data sets in order to identify malicious behavior or malicious entities. There are two inherent challenges for ML in the service of cybersecurity that AI helps to solve:

The first one: Define what's normal - understanding what system changes are normal (such as seasonality) what truly is an anomaly. AI could understand what is truly normal and what is truly anomalous. 

The second one is Context - just finding that something is anomalous isn't enough, we need to understand what happened and why. AI that truly understands the context of the event that unfolds instead of just alerting when it thinks something is weird is essential for cybersecurity.

Both of these fundamental challenges are handled by AI and help tackle cyber threats, even though and perhaps despite the fact that threats are becoming more apparent on one hand, and on the other more sophisticated and unknown.
 

  1. I note that your company Loom Systems has been name a "Cool Vendor" in AI by Gartner. Can you tell us what that means and also elaborate about your company's technological niche and capabilities in the cognitive space? 

Yes, of course. Loom was Named a 2017 Gartner Cool Vendor in Performance Analysis. Gartner mentioned that our solution bridges advanced analytics and enhanced scalability to the availability and performance management market. Loom developed a cohesive Artificial intelligence-based solution designed to predict and prevent ongoing issues in complex IT environments, namely digital environments, enabling total awareness across these environments, and essentially delivering a smooth customer experience.  Our vision is to assist digital leaders in analyzing data automatically to solve customer experience issues hidden from the business layer. We're literally connecting the dots between the business and IT operations within an organization.

With the CIO role becoming more business focused as the majority of revenue comes from digital systems, there needs to be a methodology to converge between the business impact and the systems operating the business. The best way we found this can be done is to enable real time analysis of data coming from these systems and have the experts in the organizations handle the intelligence layer – already telling them how the systems behavior impacts business and how to act.

Ultimately, this will lead to optimized decision making of people with AI assisted reasoning. This is the future of digital business.


Chuck Brooks is the Principal Market Growth Strategist -- Cybersecurity and Emerging Technologies for General Dynamics Missile Systems. LinkedIn named Chuck as one of “The Top 5 Tech People to Follow on LinkedIn” out of their 500 million members. He has published more than 150 articles and blogs on cybersecurity and technology issues. In both 2017 and 2016, he was named “Cybersecurity Marketer of the Year by the Cybersecurity Excellence Awards. Chuck’s professional industry affiliations include being the Chairman of CompTIA’s New and Emerging Technology Committee, and as a  member of The AFCEA Cybersecurity Committee. In government, Chuck has served at The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as the first Legislative Director of  The Science & Technology Directorate at the Department of Homeland Security. He served as a top Advisor to the late Senator Arlen Specter on Capitol Hill covering  security and technology issues on Capitol Hill.  In academia, Chuck is an Adjunct Faculty member at Georgetown University in their Applied Intelligence Program was an Adjunct Faculty Member at Johns Hopkins University where he taught a graduate course on homeland security for two years.  He has an MA in International relations from the University of Chicago, a BA in Political Science from DePauw University, and a Certificate in International Law from The Hague Academy of International Law.

Gabby Menachem is CEO, Loom Systems  https://www.loomsystems.com/about-us
Gabby brings over 15 years of technology innovation and entrepreneurship experience to Loom Systems. Gabby was previously co-founder and CTO of Voyager Analytics, a product that analyzes social network data with a range of customers that include leading financial institutions. Prior to that, Gabby served as GM and VP R&D in a microwave engineering startup.



 

2018 Emerging Technologies Resource Guide

2018 Emerging Technologies Resource Guide


By Chuck Brooks  |  August 30, 2018
Chuck Brooks is named Top Tech Person To Follow by LinkedIn - Cybersecurity Marketer of the Year - Technology and Security Evangelist, Speaker, Writer, Editor, Georgetown University Adjunct Faculty, FORBES Contributor


Exponential Innovation, Converged Ecosystems, Knowledge Discovery, IoT, Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, 5G, Virtual Realities, Cybersecurity, Super Computing, Quantum Computing, 3-D Printing, Smart Cities...

We are in an era of amazing exponential change. It is coming very fast and is impacting all we do and how we live. A few years back, The McKinsey Global Institute published an informative analysis that comprehensively examined the economic impact of global technology trends. The study was called, “Disruptive Technologies: Advances that will transform life, business, and the global economy.” The McKinsey predictions were highly accurate. As we move ahead into another year of unprecedented technology advancement, it is useful to examine the trends & technologies and applied verticals that are already shaping 2018. By 2019, 40% of digital transformation initiatives will use artificial intelligence; 75% of commercial enterprise apps will use AI; over 90% of consumers will interact with customer support bots; and over 50% of new industrial robots will leverage AI, Big Data and Digital Transformation.

Below are a compilation of categories, lists and short analyses that should be useful as heuristic tools in tracking and navigating the rapid and transformational changes in our paths. 

TRENDS & TECHNOLOGIES:

Artificial Intelligence: Gartner describes artificial intelligence as a “technology that appears to emulate human performance typically by learning, coming to its own conclusions, appearing to understand complex content, engaging in natural dialogs with people, enhancing human cognitive performance or replacing people on execution of non-routine tasks.“ The promise of these technologies are very exciting. Microsoft UK’s chief envisioning officer Dave Choplin claimed that AI is “the most important technology that anybody on the planet is working on today.” Human/computer interface breakthroughs that will extend human brain capacity and memory. There are new developments in “neuromorphic” tech, that can incorporate nano-chips into wearables modeled on the human brain. Eventually these nano-chips may be implanted into our brains artificially augmenting human thought and reasoning capabilities. Companies are already developing technology to distribute artificial intelligence software to millions of graphics and computer processors around the world. McKinsey predicts a $5 to 7 trillion potential economic impact by 2025 from automation of knowledge work by intelligent software systems that can perform knowledge work tasks from unstructured commands. We may also have artificially intelligent personal assistants, perhaps even in holographic forms in some sort of augmented reality. Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Twitter have formed and are prioritizing artificial intelligent teams throughout their companies. 

Machine Learning: According to Gartner, Machine-learning technology combines the "information of everything" with smart machine algorithms to make an algorithmic business possible. Machine learning algorithms are composed of a set of many technologies — deep learning, neural networks, natural-language processing and other technologies — used in unsupervised as well as supervised learning ways to understand information, activities and the world. In business, an application of machine learning includes chatbots, avatars, and digital assistants. 3D Printing and 4D self-assembling printing: 3-D printing is trailblazing future manufacturing. 3-D printing connotes a three-dimensional object that is created layer by layer via computer aided design) programs. To be able to print the object, the computer divides it into flat layers that are printed one by one. By printing with advanced pliable materials such as plastics, ceramics, metals, and graphene there have already been breakthroughs in prosthetics for medicine and wearable sensors.

High Performance Computing (Super & Quantum): The world of computing has witnessed seismic advancements since the invention of the electronic calculator in the 1960s. The past few years in information processing have been especially transformational in our hyper-connected world. What were once thought of as science fiction fantasies are now technological realties. Classical computing has become more exponentially faster and more capable and our enabling devices smaller and more adaptable. In today’s world, computing rules almost all that we do and much of it is already stored in The Cloud. The exponential upsurge of data and its uses directly impact the critical infrastructure of society, including health care, security, transportation, communications, and energy. We are starting to evolve beyond classical computing into a new data era called quantum computing. It is envisioned that quantum computing will accelerate us into the future by impacting the landscape of artificial intelligence and data analytics. The quantum computing power and speed will help us solve some of the biggest and most complex challenges we face as humans. Futurist Ray Kurzweil said that mankind will be able to “expand the scope of our intelligence a billion-fold” and that “the power of computing doubles, on average, every two years. Seymour Cray is commonly referred to as the "father of supercomputing" and his company, Cray Computing, is still a driving force in the industry. Supercomputers are differentiated from mainframe computers by their vast data storage capacities and expansive computational powers. The website Techtarget.com provides a strong working definition of HPC: "the use of parallel processing for running advanced application programs efficiently, reliably and quickly. The most common users of HPC systems are scientific researchers, engineers and academic institutions. Some government agencies, particularly the military, also rely on HPC for complex applications." HPC works hand-in-hand with supercomputing as it requires the aggregation of computer power to address problems and find solutions. The National Academy of Sciences, in its study "The Future of Supercomputing," envisions investments in supercomputing as highly beneficial and that it plays an essential role in national security and in scientific discovery.

Quantum Computing: “Quantum information science has the potential to revolutionize all manner of industries, open up new fields of discovery and accelerate scientific breakthroughs,” Michael Kratsios, Deputy Assistant to the President for Technology policy. The world of computing has witnessed seismic advancements since the invention of the electronic calculator in the 1960s. The past few years in information processing have been especially transformational. What were once thought of as science fiction fantasies are now technological realties. Classical computing has become more exponentially faster and more capable and our enabling devices smaller and more adaptable. We are starting to evolve beyond classical computing into a new data era called quantum computing. It is envisioned that quantum computing will accelerate us into the future by impacting the landscape of artificial intelligence and data analytics. The quantum computing power and speed will help us solve some of the biggest and most complex challenges we face as humans. Gartner describes quantum computing as: “[T]he use of atomic quantum states to effect computation. Data is held in qubits (quantum bits), which have the ability to hold all possible states simultaneously. Data held in qubits is affected by data held in other qubits, even when physically separated. This effect is known as entanglement.” In a simplified description, quantum computers use quantum bits or qubits instead of using binary traditional bits of ones and zeros for digital communications The Chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee minced no words Wednesday about the ongoing global arms races to develop quantum computing, saying the country that harnesses it would have a remarkable advantage in the 21st century. “I think whatever superpower gets that first, it would be like the equivalent of first digital nuclear bomb,” Rep. Mike McCaul said at the American Enterprise Institute about U.S. competition with global adversaries like China, Russia, North Korea and Iran. “Whatever country that gets that first is going be an extraordinary superpower. It will blow computing as we know it out of the water.”

Big Data & Analytics: According to the Gartner IT Glossary, Big Data is high volume, high-velocity and high-variety information assets that demand cost effective, innovative forms of information processing for enhanced insight and decision making. to Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google, estimated that we produce more data every other day than we did from the inception of early civilization until the year 2003 combined. Therefore, organizing, managing and analyzing data is more important than ever. It is estimated that by 2020, there will be 35 zettabytes of digital data. Big Data is comprised of the data governance of everything including; geospatial data, 3D data, audio and video, and unstructured text, and social media. A major focus of R&D investment is how to take high-speed data streams of both 'structured data" (residing in a predetermined field) and "unstructured data" (not organized in a pre-defined manner). Eighty percent of data is unstructured. That means specialized optic technologies, software algorithms and innovative processes are necessary to de-clutter data and allow for distillation and sophisticated assessment. The goal of this type of technology is to develop a deployable, fully automated, real-time, secure way to collect and analyze complex streams of data. Digital Transformation of data includes digitizing the user experience, data flow, supply chain management, governance, engagement, e-government and virtual government. In its basic description, it is turning paper into electronic records. Going from paper-based to electronically based systems of documentation requires data collection, processing and analysis. Last year at the annual World Economic Forum meeting in DAVOS, it was announced the combined value of digital transformation -- for society and the industry -- could be greater than $100 trillion by 2025. That transformation includes the immersive inclusion of digital technologies and cloud-based platforms. It also includes analytics, sensors, mobility and a new era of automation impacting all industries and verticals including financial, energy, security, communications, and health. Data Analytics: With the rise of big data, data driven decision making and probability thinking is growing. Data is everywhere flowing from the sensor networks that surround us and is the transactional roots of our activities. What , why, and how we make choices in our lives are reflected in and can be discerned through the collection, organization, and taxonomy of that data. When the extracted data is systematically combined with multi-layered analytics, it creates a forensic and predictive meaning that can be transformed into actionable insights in reporting systems. The future of applied data analytics looms bright and the data sets of disparate information are seemingly endless. Technological R&D advances such as "machine thinking," which will allow connected devices on the "Internet of Things" to talk to and learn from each other, will contribute immensely to the use of data analytics. Open Data sharing is also catalyzing the development of new analytical capabilities. In the private sector, information mined from transactions can be used for demographical analysis and to calculate consumer purchasing habits, credit risks and predict consumer trends. Financial institutions can use predictive algorithms to create the best financial management options from market and transactional data. Combined with social media analytics, optimizing economic forecasting has become a new data analytic art. 

Internet of Things: Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the general idea of things that are readable, recognizable, locatable, addressable, and/or controllable via the Internet. Most everything nowadays is connected to the internet by sensors. Cisco, who terms the “Internet of Things”, “The Internet of Everything,” predicts that 50 billion devices (including our smartphones, appliances, and office equipment) will be wirelessly connected via a network of sensors to the internet by 2020. the analyst firm IDC predicts that spending on IoT will reach nearly $1.4 trillion in 2021. Dr. Janusz Bryzek, vice president of MEMS and Sensing Solutions at Fairchild Semiconductor, predicts there will be 45 trillion networked sensors 20 years from now. This will be driven by smart systems, including IoT, mobile and wearable market growth, digital health, context computing, global environmental monitoring, and artificial intelligence (AI), hyperimaging, macroscopes, medical “labs on a chip,” and silicon photonics IoT is conjoined with the Internet of Everything (IoE). Cisco defines IoE as the networked connection of people, process, data, and things. The benefit of IoE is derived from the compound impact of connecting people, process, data, and things, and the value this increased connectedness creates as “everything” comes online. Gartner lists the pillars of IoE as: People, Data, Process, and Things. Security is and will continue be a major factor in both IoT and IoE. 5G and IoT: Fifth-generation wireless, or 5G, is the latest iteration of cellular technology, engineered to greatly increase the speed and responsiveness of wireless networks. 5G will be the backbone of most future networks. New 5G connections which will be used in IoT connectivity, critical infrastructure, and all industry verticals.

Smart Cities: Smart Cities integrate transportation, energy, water resources, waste collections, smart-building technologies, and security technologies and services. The term “smart city” connotes creating a public/private infrastructure to conduct activities that protect and secure citizens. This includes shared situational awareness and enabling integrated operational actions to prevent, mitigate, respond to, and recover from cyber incidents as well as crime, terrorism and natural disasters. In the past few years, cities have migrated from analog to digital and have become increasingly “smarter”. A smart city uses digital technologies for information and communication technologies to enhance quality and performance of urban services, to reduce costs and resource consumption, and to engage more effectively and actively with its citizens. A smart city is indeed a laboratory for applied innovation. A smart city and its accompanying ecosystem can influence and impact the industrial verticals including transportation, energy, power generation, and agriculture. Frost & Sullivan estimates the combined global market potential of smart city segments (transportation, healthcare, building, infrastructure, energy, governance) to be $1.5 Trillion ($20B by 2050 on sensors alone according to Navigant Technology). Experts at the SmartAmerica Challenge predict that $41 Trillion will be spent on smart cities over the next 20 years to upgrade infrastructure to benefit from IoT advances

Cybersecurity: 5,207 breaches and 7.89 billion information records were compromised globally in 2017. Information assurance and resilience are the glues that will keep our world of converged sensors and algorithms operational. Technology development continues to evolve with the introduction of new innovations to address the cybersecurity framework that includes networks, payloads, endpoints, firewalls, anti-virus software, and encryption. This framework will provide for better resiliency and also forensic analysis capabilities. Some newer areas of cybersecurity spending will be in the areas of cloud, authentication, biometrics, mobility, automation, including self-encrypting drives. And, of course, super-computing and quantum computing. In the U.S., most (approximately 85 percent) of the cybersecurity critical infrastructure including defense, oil and gas, electric power grids, healthcare, utilities, communications, transportation, banking, and finance, is owned by the private sector and regulated by the public sector. With larger attack surfaces and connectivity, companies and agencies have to be better at incident detection, response, and recover. There is a growing need for the following in government and private sector: 1) Better encryption, authentication and biometrics (quantum encryption, keyless authentication, etc.); 2) automated network security and adaptive self-encrypting drives (artificial intelligence and machine learning) to protect critical infrastructure in all categories; 3) the protection of critical infrastructure through technologies and public-private cooperation; 4) technologies for "real time" horizon scanning and monitoring of networks; 5) advanced defense for framework layers (network, payload, endpoint, firewalls and anti-virus); and 6) diagnostic and forensics analysis. Cybersecurity automation certainly is key, "There are too many things happening - too much data, too many attackers, too much of an attack surface to defend - that without those automated capabilities that you get with artificial intelligence and machine learning, you don't have a prayer of being able to defend yourself," Art Coviello, a partner at Rally Ventures and the former chairman of RSA. There are many other emerging technologies that are part of future cybersecurity toolkit. They include edge computing, encryption, virtualization, photonics, hypervisors, hardware based trust anchors, anti-malware detection systems, and converged software defined environment.

Blockchain also offers promise as a cybersecurity application. It is a peer to peer network with a shared, distributed ledger. Blockchain’s decentralized technology offers cyber-defenses from many types of attacks because it removes single failure points that many often hackers prey upon. It is already being used in the financial sector and offers selective transparency and privacy.

Robotics: Robots are no longer Jetson like technologies, they exist. They are physical machines used to automate tasks and usually directed by computer programs. They have applications for manufacturing, and construction, and for exploration of terrain, oceans and space. They are now also the subject of both policy questions and moral dilemmas. Will they take jobs away from workers? And in a future incarnation; combined with artificial intelligence, will robots pose a threat to mankind? 

Materials Science: Exciting research in materials science are creating stronger, durable, lighter, and even “self-healing” materials. Nanomaterials artificially engineered at molecular scale synthetic composites are now being designed at the inter-atomic level. The capability to design and manufacture infrastructure such as bridges, roads, buildings with stronger, adaptable, self-intelligent, and seemingly eternal materials will revolutionize the construction and transportation industries. 

UAS and drones can also be included in this category. Rapid proliferation of UAS is both military and civilian markets require solutions for identification, interdiction, and monitoring. UAS and Drones also have many potential applications in transportation, commerce, emergency response, and security. Supercomputing: Supercomputing and the corollary of high-performance computing have become the means mechanisms for those vital tasks. 

Virtualization and Augmented Reality: The world is going virtual and it being supported by a myriad of new and exciting technologies including artificial intelligence, augmented reality, and exponential connectivity to both people and objects. Augmented reality intertwines the physical and digital world by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics, and sometimes even smell. Google Glass and Oculus Rift, are already good examples of these emerging technologies. Virtual communications combined with virtual reality will become integrated into business applications. It can also serve as an outlet of entertainment and already is in gaming at on attractions such as “Soaring” at Disney World. The analytical firm Digi-Capital forecasts Augmented/Virtual Reality revenue forecast to hit $120 billion by 2020.

Wearables: these include flexible electronics Wrist bands, rings, glasses, ear pods, contact lenses, attachable, wearable, and embedded. There may be upwards of 604 million users of wearable biometrics by 2019 according to Goode Intelligence. The trend of wearables is an emerging one with seemingly limitless possibilities. The question is no longer when wearable tech will be available, but how fast, these technologies will extend human /computer interface capabilities and how ingrained in our daily lives that these technologies will ultimately become.

Emerging Tech In Applied Verticals: Health and Bio-Sciences In the next decade, we will witness novel libraries, made of evolving informational data of our health or diseased states. Most important, we will be able to develop physic codes (electric, magnetic, mechanical) able to reprogram in situ our tissue-resident stem cells to boost self-healing mechanisms. “Pieces” of stem cell codes will go into machines. * Health- Implantable devices; (i.e. bionic eyes, limbs) * DNA nanomedicines and delivery * Genomic techniques – gene therapy (Gene therapy to enhance strength, endurance and lifespan Gene therapy to enhance human intelligence) * Telemedicine, remote sensing tech (Wearables) Health monitoring via sensors, patches * Medicine for longevity, enhancement * Artificial Intelligence healthcare decision support * Real-time biomarker tracking and monitoring * Artificially grown organs * Human regeneration Human cells interfaced with nanotech * Cybernetics * Exoskeletons for mobility Transportation * Sustainability of infrastructure * Connected Transportation; converged transportation ecosystems and monitoring * Autonomous and connected cars * Next gen trains * Predictive analytics (parking, traffic patterns) * New Materials for stronger construction and resilience Energy * Solar power * Waste to biofuels * Protecting the Grid * Batteries (long lasting) * Renewables * Energy efficiency and sustainability * Safe nuclear * Hydrogen fuels Law Enforcement: * Security & Surveillance (chemical and bio sensors, cameras, drones) * Terrorism informatics * License plate readers * Non-lethal technologies * Forensics * Interoperable communications and situational awareness * Biometrics: Security screening by bio-signature: Every aspect of your physiology can be used as a bio-signature. Measure unique heart/pulse rates, electrocardiogram sensor, blood oximetry, skin temperature * Robo cops Banking & Finance: * Mobile payments * Mobile banking * Cashless society * Assured identity management * Biometric Security: access control facial recognition, voice recognition, iris and retina scanners, fingerprint sensors on tablets and smartphones – pass keys Agriculture: * Aqua farming * Vertical farming * Water purification * New food manufacturing and production tech * Food security 

These are just some of the emerging tech areas and verticals that are already transforming our world. There are many more that were left out as new discoveries materials science, chemistry, physics and nanotechnologies offer endless possibilities. Wait for 2019!


This article is also found on LinkedIn

Trends In Emerging Cognitive Technologies and Predictive Analytics

Trends In Emerging Cognitive Technologies and Predictive Analytics


By Chuck Brooks   |  March 24, 2018


An interview with Gabby Menachem, CEO of Loom Systems, named by Gartner as a “Cool Vendor” in Artificial Intelligence


  1. Beyond the hype, what are the perils and promises of emerging cognitive technologies? More specifically, are artificial intelligence and machine learning something to fear or cultivate? 

That's a great question that I encounter a lot, and I think it's also being fostered a lot by media and popular science. For example, the late Stephen Hawking has been a passionate advocate of the "AI will destroy humanity as we know it" theme, with the apocalyptic prediction that AI “could spell the end of the human race.”

But I think there's a huge and very common misconception on the meta-question of the 'Man vs. Machine' dispute, where I believe that should not be our focal point at all, rather we should be talking about a man and machine convergence, enabling each entity to maximize its potential and achieve things that alone cannot be done. Cognitive technologies can dramatically empower humanity to get ahead and make immense progress in a very wide range of areas. We simply need to get rid of fear and bias, which can be done through education.

The biggest promise I see in cognitive technology today is with intelligent automation. In many cases we encounter repetitive tasks done by humans since machines are hard to program to make decisions on unknown data. Examples span from smart filtering in recycling through Cyber defense, where in the latter the knowledge base that need to be applied to context is the hardest to put in software.

Building cognitive technologies enables this layer of intelligence which will ultimately lead to a higher degree of automation and easier application development – this is very exciting!
 

  1. In a data driven world, how fast is the industry moving toward cognitive recognition and automation and how will it impact our way of life?

In the past few years we've been seeing immense advancements in automations that span across every industry out there, and I think it's fascinating what cognitive sciences in general can do for entire verticals.

With the rise of big data in the last decade, data driven decision making and probability thinking is growing as a field with data scientist job demand. As the industry grows, we see that the shortage in human capital is not only a consequence of education focus, but mainly of skill and experience applying the academic methods to real life problems.

This is why in many cases the first place for cognitive recognition and automation is incorporating the methodologies of data science to big data – mimicking the thought process a human would do looking at the same data but with the diligence and speed of a computer.

The industry is applying this to use cases in different methods – from deep learning to rule based systems with changing parameters, but this is only the surface of what can be achieved. The future of cognitive computing will make decision making and knowledge systems use much easier and will empower humans in their day to day.
 

  1. Intelligent insights combined with real-time predictive analytics have taken the center stage in digital transformation. Can you offer a primer on the capabilities of both machine learning and artificial intelligence in play roles in this transformation? 

The digital transformation impact is in its infancy. As the industry focus on the value of data derived from digital processes increases, we will see more intelligent use cases for ML and AI.
 

Today we see machine learning and AI applied to areas of customer interaction – like understanding customer behavior and trends automatically to optimize delivery, through customer experience – where ML and AI are used to track every customer journey and offer assistance or signal technical resources when a customer needs help, and last to internal operations, where the technology helps in optimizing performance and self-service by understanding the needs of employees.
 

The two areas I see AI play a huge role in 2018 are surfacing unknown patterns in data and solving the skills gap needed to address this new knowledge or insight. The capabilities around these problems are very well established in terms of technology, though a lot of work is to be done in packaging these capabilities to solve customer experience issues.

As AI adoption grows, I believe intelligent insights combined with predictive analytics will help drive the industry’s applications as this is where value is created from data we already collect and is the next step in capturing the value from this evolution.
 

  1. Against the backdrop of an increasingly interconnected world, with a growing attack surface of the Internet of Things, are there ways that artificial intelligence and machine learning help us be more cyber secure? 

Machine learning is already being used to detect anomalies in large data sets in order to identify malicious behavior or malicious entities. There are two inherent challenges for ML in the service of cybersecurity that AI helps to solve:

The first one: Define what's normal - understanding what system changes are normal (such as seasonality) what truly is an anomaly. AI could understand what is truly normal and what is truly anomalous. 

The second one is Context - just finding that something is anomalous isn't enough, we need to understand what happened and why. AI that truly understands the context of the event that unfolds instead of just alerting when it thinks something is weird is essential for cybersecurity.

Both of these fundamental challenges are handled by AI and help tackle cyber threats, even though and perhaps despite the fact that threats are becoming more apparent on one hand, and on the other more sophisticated and unknown.
 

  1. I note that your company Loom Systems has been name a "Cool Vendor" in AI by Gartner. Can you tell us what that means and also elaborate about your company's technological niche and capabilities in the cognitive space? 

Yes, of course. Loom was Named a 2017 Gartner Cool Vendor in Performance Analysis. Gartner mentioned that our solution bridges advanced analytics and enhanced scalability to the availability and performance management market. Loom developed a cohesive Artificial intelligence-based solution designed to predict and prevent ongoing issues in complex IT environments, namely digital environments, enabling total awareness across these environments, and essentially delivering a smooth customer experience.  Our vision is to assist digital leaders in analyzing data automatically to solve customer experience issues hidden from the business layer. We're literally connecting the dots between the business and IT operations within an organization.

With the CIO role becoming more business focused as the majority of revenue comes from digital systems, there needs to be a methodology to converge between the business impact and the systems operating the business. The best way we found this can be done is to enable real time analysis of data coming from these systems and have the experts in the organizations handle the intelligence layer – already telling them how the systems behavior impacts business and how to act.

Ultimately, this will lead to optimized decision making of people with AI assisted reasoning. This is the future of digital business.


Chuck Brooks is the Principal Market Growth Strategist -- Cybersecurity and Emerging Technologies for General Dynamics Missile Systems. LinkedIn named Chuck as one of “The Top 5 Tech People to Follow on LinkedIn” out of their 500 million members. He has published more than 150 articles and blogs on cybersecurity and technology issues. In both 2017 and 2016, he was named “Cybersecurity Marketer of the Year by the Cybersecurity Excellence Awards. Chuck’s professional industry affiliations include being the Chairman of CompTIA’s New and Emerging Technology Committee, and as a  member of The AFCEA Cybersecurity Committee. In government, Chuck has served at The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as the first Legislative Director of  The Science & Technology Directorate at the Department of Homeland Security. He served as a top Advisor to the late Senator Arlen Specter on Capitol Hill covering  security and technology issues on Capitol Hill.  In academia, Chuck is an Adjunct Faculty member at Georgetown University in their Applied Intelligence Program was an Adjunct Faculty Member at Johns Hopkins University where he taught a graduate course on homeland security for two years.  He has an MA in International relations from the University of Chicago, a BA in Political Science from DePauw University, and a Certificate in International Law from The Hague Academy of International Law.

Gabby Menachem is CEO, Loom Systems  https://www.loomsystems.com/about-us
Gabby brings over 15 years of technology innovation and entrepreneurship experience to Loom Systems. Gabby was previously co-founder and CTO of Voyager Analytics, a product that analyzes social network data with a range of customers that include leading financial institutions. Prior to that, Gabby served as GM and VP R&D in a microwave engineering startup.



 

Emerging Technologies for the Public Sector

Emerging Technologies for the Public Sector


By Chuck Brooks  |  July 27, 2017


We have entered a new technological era in commerce and it has also arrived in government. There are a variety of tech verticals to watch in the coming transformation, including:


1) data science; 2) digital transformation; 3) the Internet of Things; 4) 3-D printing; and 5) cybersecurity


Collaboration, agility, innovation and engagement have emerged as driving factors for agency performance and progress will be determined by combining these factors with adoption and integration of new technologies and services.


DATA SCIENCE

Data science is an encompassing category. It includes big data, advanced analytics and predictive computing, and knowledge management, along with information-sharing via convergence to common smart platforms. Collaborative investment and information-sharing between government and private stakeholders will exponentially benefit innovation and data informatics in many key areas including homeland/national security, health and human services, public safety, and transportation. Social media has also become part of the federal government ecosystem.

The challenge is to automate technology and methods to analyze large amounts of unstructured data with application interfaces and convergence to smart interoperable platforms. The use of the cloud and innovative application software can now help government keep pace with the innovation trends in commercial sectors.

According to Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google, we produce more data every other day than we did from the inception of early civilization until the year 2003 combined. Therefore organizing, managing and analyzing data is more important than ever.

Big data and data analytics are collapsing the information gap and giving businesses and governments the tools they need to uncover trends, population movements, customer preferences, demographics, commerce traffic, transportation, etc. These tools can also help several industries, including customer service, by identifying caller trends; healthcare, by flagging potential fraud; and financial services, by proactively flagging a borrower that is on the verge of lapsing in payment. The value of data analytics is something agencies and businesses cannot ignore because it can increase productivity, efficiency, decision-making and new business activities.

In homeland security, and in healthcare, many interesting applications of data analytics are being incorporated into government programs for case management situational awareness and mitigation.

DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION

Digital Transformation includes digitizing the customer experience, data flow, supply chain management, governance, engagement, e-government and virtual government. In its basic description, it is turning paper into electronic records. Going from paper-based to electronically based systems of documentation requires data collection, processing and analysis.

The United States government maintains one of largest repository of documents in the world. Millions of supporting documents are compiled and stored every year by a multitude of government agencies which have a responsibility to preserve, secure and retrieve vital information when needed. While paper documents are still very much routine for government operations, the goal has been to increasingly move from paper to electronic images. That is not an easy task considering the amount of documents being stored and used across government.

The federal government has recognized these challenges and has established the OpenGov initiative and the Citizen Archivist Project. Digitizing records reduces costs by speeding up document capture, recognition and retrieval. It also ensures file integrity and better access to data for the citizens the government serves.

The technological advances mentioned by the White House in a press release on the digital initiatives are significant. Automated optical capabilities are changing how documents are scanned and are being managed. For example, a new era of advanced imaging science, combined with skilled engineering, has led to incredible optical character recognition (OCR) capabilities in document scanners. New algorithms interact with a library of form recognition protocols, machine print, hand print and the integration of contextual logic databases for automated validation. Molecular scanners that will really transform optical recognition are now in the research and development stages.

Digitization also has a significant impact on transaction processing in the government sector especially in agencies such as the Department of Treasury, Department of Labor, and U.S. Customs and Immigration Service at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The ability to process electronic payments, reconcile information, create digitized audit trails and handle reporting requirements are critical for effective and more responsive government services to citizens.

Digitization is rapidly enhancing the capabilities of e-government. The 2016 fiscal budget request proposes spending $105 million to "scale and institutionalize" the evolving U.S. Digital Service citizen-facing services. The funding will create digital services teams in 25 key high-impact federal agencies to improve how citizens and businesses experience government services.

INTERNET OF THINGS

The Internet of Things (IOT) refers to the emerging connectivity of embedded devices to the Internet. It is estimated that there will be 64 billon connected Internet devices by 2020. The commercial and governmental IOT "landscape of sensors" is becoming more exponential and complex by the moment.

In the public sector, government agencies are being tasked to keep pace with expanding customer service requirements emanating from the connected economy. New citizen engagement strategies involving technology, policy, programs and intra/inter-agency collaboration are required to address the avalanche of needs and fixes associated with interoperability and the IOT of smart government.

A recent Cisco study summarized some of the key opportunities and benefits in transportation, healthcare, telework and connected learning. The study noted that "by enabling new connections among people, process, data, and things, governments and their agencies worldwide can save money, improve employee productivity, and generate new revenue (without raising taxes), while creating quantifiable benefits for citizens."

Two growing specialized areas of IOT in government to watch include smart cities and connected transportation.

Smart Cities integrate transportation, energy, water resources, waste collections, smart-building technologies and security technologies and services. The term "smart city" connotes creating a public-private infrastructure to conduct activities that protect and secure citizens. This includes shared situational awareness and enabling integrated operational actions to prevent, mitigate, respond to and recover from cyber incidents as well as crime, terrorism and natural disasters. It also signifies the betterment of public services, conduct of commerce and meeting the expanding logistical health, financial, transportation and communication requirements for those who choose to live in an urban setting. Many companies are becoming proactive in preparing for the expansion of IOT. For example, IBM recently announced that it is making a $3 billion investment in future IOT projects and initiatives such as smarter planet and smarter cities.

A "connected transportation system," and more specifically, "connected cars," allow for safer and more efficient urban mobility and is a priority for federal, state and local governments. Connected car technology is evolving rapidly and is now being tested.

For example, in a groundbreaking public-private partnership, the University of Michigan has created a 32-acre simulated city. It is called The Mobility Transformation Center (MTC), and it is designed to simulate traffic events and road conditions for automated and autonomous vehicles. It is the largest test facility of its kind and run in partnership with the U.S. Department of Transportation as well as 13 companies, including GM, Ford and Xerox. The MTC recreates the everyday driving experience, ranging from the unpredictable behavior of drivers and pedestrians to roadblocks, railroad crossings and aging infrastructure. When it's fully developed, 30,000 cars will be deployed at the test facility and throughout southeastern Michigan.

3-D PRINTING

Smart 3-D printing is trailblazing future manufacturing. 3-D printing connotes a three-dimensional object that is created layer by layer via computer-aided design programs. To be able to print the object, the computer divides it into flat layers that are printed one by one. By printing with advanced pliable materials such as plastics, ceramics, metals and graphene, there have already been breakthroughs in prosthetics for medicine and wearable sensors. The big advantage for government is that 3-D printing can be customized, produced rapidly and is cost effective.

The possibilities for 3-D printing are seemingly limitless. Recently, Rolls-Royce announced that it would use 3-D printing to make parts for its jet engines, and BAE Systems announced that fighter jets containing 3-D-printed parts are now being flown.

3-D printing innovation are also making its way into printing electronics, sensors and circuits. "Printed electronics" or electronic chips are fabricated by printing their features on top of thin surfaces. Using semiconducting and conductive inks and materials, 3-D printers can now print transistors, sensors, circuits, batteries and displays.

CYBERSECURITY

Cybersecurity, information assurance and resilience are the glues that will keep our world of converged sensors and algorithms operational. This has become one of the largest areas of government spending at all agencies and is consistently ranked the top priority among government and industry CIOs in surveys.

In the U.S., most (approximately 85 percent) of the cybersecurity critical infrastructure including defense, oil and gas, electric power grids, healthcare, utilities, communications, transportation, banking, and finance, is owned by the private sector and regulated by the public sector. 2014 was the year of the breach for many large corporations in a variety of sectors. The leading civilian agency in the government for public-private cooperation in cybersecurity is DHS. The department has recognized the importance for private sector input into cybersecurity requirements across these verticals and has played a major part in bringing government and industry together to develop a strategy to protect critical infrastructure.

There is a growing need for the following in government: 1) Better encryption, authentication and biometrics (quantum encryption, keyless authentication, etc.); 2) automated network security and self-encrypting drives to protect critical infrastructure in all categories; 3) the protection of critical infrastructure through technologies and public-private cooperation; 4) technologies for "real time" horizon scanning and monitoring of networks; 5) advanced defense for framework layers (network, payload, endpoint, firewalls and anti-virus); and 6) diagnostic and forensics analysis.

Additionally, bring your own device (BYOD) is a major area of concern for managing the mobile government workforce. Also, cyber resilience is an area that must be further developed both in processes and technologies. There is no panacea for the myriad of threats we all digitally face every day. Supercomputing and quantum computing technologies are an exciting area of current exploration that may remedy many of the threats. National labs and government agencies such as the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency are leading the way in the advanced technology cybersecurity realm.

These are just a few of the government verticals deriving benefits from catalyzing technologies in the next few years. As the rate and depth of engagement and collaboration between the private and public sectors grows, so will the dividends. A dedicated partnership between industry and government will be critical for success.

Emerging Technologies for the Public Sector

Chuck Brooks is Vice President of Government Relations & Marketing for Sutherland Government Solutions.  In both 2017 and 2016, he was named “Cybersecurity Marketer of the Year by the Cybersecurity Excellence Awards. LinkedIn named Chuck as one of “The Top 5 Tech People to Follow on LinkedIn” out of their 500 million members.  Chuck’s professional industry affiliations include being the Chairman of CompTIA’s New and Emerging Technology Committee, and as a  member of The AFCEA Cybersecurity Committee. In government, Chuck has served at The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as the first Legislative Director of  The Science & Technology Directorate at the Department of Homeland Security. He served as a top Advisor to the late Senator Arlen Specter on Capitol Hill covering  security and technology issues on Capitol Hill.  In academia, Chuck was an Adjunct Faculty Member at Johns Hopkins University where he taught a graduate course on homeland security for two years.  He has an MA in International relations from the University of Chicago, a BA in Political Science from DePauw University, and a Certificate in International Law from The Hague Academy of International Law.  
 

Emerging Technologies to Watch in 2017

Emerging Technologies to Watch in 2017

Emerging Technologies to Watch in 2017
By Chuck Brooks


A few years back, The McKinsey Global Institute published an informative analysis that comprehensively examined the economic impact of global technology trends. The study was called “Disruptive Technologies: Advances that will transform life, business, and the global economy.”  The McKinsey predictions were highly accurate. As we move ahead into another year of unprecedented technology advancement, it is useful to examine the trends & technologies and applied verticals that are already shaping 2017. Below are a compilation of categories, lists and short synopses that should be useful as heuristic tools in tracking and navigating the rapid and transformational changes in our paths.

TRENDS & TECHNOLOGIES

Artificial Intelligence: Gartner describes artificial intelligence as a “technology that appears to emulate human performance typically by learning, coming to its own conclusions, appearing to understand complex content, engaging in natural dialogs with people, enhancing human cognitive performance or replacing people on execution of non-routine tasks.“ The promise of these technologies are very exciting. Microsoft UK’s chief envisioning officer Dave Choplin claimed that AI is “the most important technology that anybody on the planet is working on today.” Human/computer interface breakthroughs that will extend human brain capacity and memory. There are new developments in “neuromorphic” tech, that can incorporate nano-chips into wearables modeled on the human brain. Eventually these nano-chips may be implanted into our brains artificially augmenting human thought and reasoning capabilities. Companies are already developing technology to distribute artificial intelligence software to millions of graphics and computer processors around the world. McKinsey predicts a $5 to 7 trillion potential economic impact by 2025 from automation of knowledge work by intelligent software systems that can perform knowledge work tasks from unstructured commands. We may also have artificially intelligent personal assistants, perhaps even in holographic forms in some sort of augmented reality. Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Twitter have formed and are prioritizing artificial intelligent teams throughout their companies.

High Performance Computing (Super & Quantum): The world of computing has witnessed seismic advancements since the invention of the electronic calculator in the 1960s. The past few years in information processing have been especially transformational in our hyper-connected world. What were once thought of as science fiction fantasies are now technological realties. Classical computing has become more exponentially faster and more capable and our enabling devices smaller and more adaptable.  In today’s world, computing rules almost all that we do and much of it is already stored in The Cloud. The exponential upsurge of data and its uses directly impact the critical infrastructure of society, including health care, security, transportation, communications, and energy. We are starting to evolve beyond classical computing into a new data era called quantum computing. It is envisioned that quantum computing will accelerate us into the future by impacting the landscape of artificial intelligence and data analytics. The quantum computing power and speed will help us solve some of the biggest and most complex challenges we face as humans. Futurist Ray Kurzweil said that mankind will be able to “expand the scope of our intelligence a billion-fold” and that “the power of computing doubles, on average, every two years.

Big Data:  According to the Gartner IT Glossary, Big Data is high volume, high-velocity and high-variety information assets that demand cost effective, innovative forms of information processing for enhanced insight and decision making. to Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google, estimated that we produce more data every other day than we did from the inception of early civilization until the year 2003 combined. Therefore, organizing, managing and analyzing data is more important than ever. It is estimated that by 2020, there will be 35 zettabytes of digital data. Big Data is comprised of the data governance of everything  including; geospatial data, 3D data, audio and video, and unstructured text, and social media.

Digital transformation:  Digital Transformation includes digitizing the customer experience, data flow, supply chain management, governance, engagement, e-government and virtual government. In its basic description, it is turning paper into electronic records. Going from paper-based to electronically based systems of documentation requires data collection, processing and analysis. Last year at the annual World Economic Forum meeting in DAVOS, it was announced the combined value of digital transformation -- for society and the industry -- could be greater than $100 trillion by 2025. That transformation includes the immersive inclusion of digital technologies and cloud-based platforms. It also includes analytics, sensors, mobility and a new era of automation impacting all industries and verticals including financial, energy, security, communications, and health.

Internet of Things:  Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the general idea of things that are readable, recognizable, locatable, addressable, and/or controllable via the Internet. Most everything nowadays is connected to the internet by sensors. Cisco, who terms the “Internet of Things,” “The Internet of Everything,” predicts that 50 billion devices (including our smartphones, appliances, and office equipment) will be wirelessly connected via a network of sensors to the internet by 2020. IoT is conjoined with the Internet of Everything (IoE); Cisco defines IoE as the networked connection of people, process, data, and things. The benefit of IoE is derived from the compound impact of connecting people, process, data, and things, and the value this increased connectedness creates as “everything” comes online. Gartner lists the pillars of IoE as: People, Data, Process, and Things. Security is and will continue be a major factor in both IoT and IoE.

Analytics:  Data is everywhere flowing from the sensor networks that surround us and is the transactional roots of our activities. What , why, and how we make choices in our lives are reflected in and can be discerned through the collection, organization, and taxonomy of that data. When the extracted data is systematically combined with multi-layered analytics, it creates a forensic and predictive meaning that can be transformed into actionable insights in reporting systems.  The future of applied data analytics looms bright and the data sets of disparate information are seemingly endless. Technological R&D advances such as "machine thinking," which will allow connected devices on the "Internet of Things" to talk to and learn from each other, will contribute immensely to the use of data analytics. Open Data sharing is also catalyzing the development of new analytical capabilities.

Cybersecurity:    information assurance and resilience are the glues that will keep our world of converged sensors and algorithms operational. In the U.S., most (approximately 85 percent) of the cybersecurity critical infrastructure including defense, oil and gas, electric power grids, healthcare, utilities, communications, transportation, banking, and finance, is owned by the private sector and regulated by the public sector.There is a growing need for the following in government: 1) Better encryption, authentication and biometrics (quantum encryption, keyless authentication, etc.); 2) automated network security and adaptive self-encrypting drives to protect critical infrastructure in all categories; 3) the protection of critical infrastructure through technologies and public-private cooperation; 4) technologies for "real time" horizon scanning and monitoring of networks; 5) advanced defense for framework layers (network, payload, endpoint, firewalls and anti-virus); and 6) diagnostic and forensics analysis.

Robotics:  Robots are no longer Jetson like technologies, they exist. They are physical machines used to automate tasks and usually directed by computer programs. They have applications for manufacturing, and construction, and for exploration of terrain, oceans and space. They are now also the subject of both policy questions and moral dilemmas. Will they take jobs away from workers? And in a future incarnation; combined with artificial intelligence, will robots pose a threat to mankind?

Materials Science: Exciting research in materials science are creating stronger, durable, lighter, and even “self-healing” materials. Nanomaterials artificially engineered at molecular scale synthetic composites are now being designed at the inter-atomic level. The capability to design and manufacture infrastructure such as bridges, roads, buildings with stronger, adaptable, self-intelligent, and seemingly eternal materials will revolutionize the construction and transportation industries.

Virtualization and Augmented Reality:  The world is going virtual and it being supported by a myriad of new and exciting technologies including artificial intelligence, augmented reality, and exponential connectivity to both people and objects. Augmented reality intertwines the physical and digital world by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics, and sometimes even smell. Google Glass and Oculus Rift, are already good examples of these emerging technologies. Virtual communications combined with virtual reality will become integrated into business applications. It can also serve as an outlet of entertainment and already is in gaming at on attractions such as “Soaring” at Disney World. The analytical firm Digi-Capital forecasts Augmented/Virtual Reality revenue forecast to hit $120 billion by 2020.

Machine Learning:  According to GartnerMachine-learning technology combines the "information of everything" with smart machine algorithms to make an algorithmic business possible. Machine learning algorithms are composed of a set of many technologies — deep learning, neural networks, natural-language processing and other technologies — used in unsupervised as well as supervised learning ways to understand information, activities and the world. In business, an application of machine learning includes chatbots, avatars, and digital assistants.

3D Printing and 4D self-assembling printing: 3-D printing is trailblazing future manufacturing. 3-D printing connotes a three-dimensional object that is created layer by layer via computer aided design) programs. To be able to print the object, the computer divides it into flat layers that are printed one by one. By printing with advanced pliable materials such as plastics, ceramics, metals, and graphene there have already been breakthroughs in prosthetics for medicine and wearable sensors.

Wearables:  these include flexible electronics Wrist bands, rings, glasses, ear pods, contact lenses, attachable, wearable, and embedded. There may be upwards of 604 million users of wearable biometrics by 2019 according to Goode Intelligence. The trend of wearables is an emerging one with seemingly limitless possibilities. The question is no longer when wearable tech will be available, but how fast, these technologies will extend human /computer interface capabilities and how ingrained in our daily lives that these technologies will ultimately become.

Smart Cities:  Smart Cities integrate transportation, energy, water resources, waste collections, smart-building technologies, and security technologies and services. The term “smart city” connotes creating a public/private infrastructure to conduct activities that protect and secure citizens. This includes shared situational awareness and enabling integrated operational actions to prevent, mitigate, respond to, and recover from cyber incidents as well as crime, terrorism and natural disasters. In the past few years, cities have migrated from analog to digital and have become increasingly “smarter”. A smart city uses digital technologies for information and communication technologies to enhance quality and performance of urban services, to reduce costs and resource consumption, and to engage more effectively and actively with its citizens. A smart city is indeed a laboratory for applied innovation. A smart city and its accompanying ecosystem can influence and impact the industrial verticals including transportation, energy, power generation, and agriculture. Frost & Sullivan estimates the combined global market potential of smart city segments (transportation, healthcare, building, infrastructure, energy, governance) to be $1.5 Trillion ($20B by 2050 on sensors alone according to Navigant Technology).


APPLIED VERTICALS:

Health and Bio-Sciences

* Health- Implantable devices; (i.e. bionic eyes, limbs)

* DNA nanomedicines and delivery

* Genomic techniques – gene therapy (Gene therapy to enhance strength, endurance and lifespan Gene therapy to enhance human intelligence)

* Telemedicine, remote sensing tech (Wearables) Health monitoring via sensors, patches

* Medicine for longevity, enhancement

* Artificial Intelligence healthcare decision support

* Real-time biomarker tracking and monitoring

* Artificially grown organs

* Human regeneration Human cells interfaced with nanotech

* Cybernetics

* Exoskeletons for mobility

Transportation

 * Sustainability of infrastructure

*  Connected Transportation; converged transportation ecosystems and monitoring

* Autonomous and connected cars

* Next gen trains

* Predictive analytics (parking, traffic patterns)

* New Materials for stronger construction and resilience

Energy

* Solar power

* Waste to biofuels

* Protecting the Grid

* Batteries (long lasting)

* Renewables

* Energy efficiency and sustainability

* Safe nuclear

* Hydrogen fuels

Law Enforcement: 

 * Surveillance (chemical and bio sensors, cameras, drones)

* Terrorism informatics

* License plate readers

* Non-lethal technologies

* Forensics

* Interoperable communications and situational awareness

* Biometrics: Security screening by bio-signature: Every aspect of your physiology can be used as a bio-signature. Measure unique heart/pulse rates, electrocardiogram sensor, blood oximetry, skin temperature

* Robo cops

Banking & Finance:

* Mobile payments

* Mobile banking

* Cashless society

* Assured identity management

* Biometric Security: access control facial recognition, voice recognition, iris and retina scanners, fingerprint sensors on tablets and smartphones – pass keys

Agriculture:

* Aqua farming

* Vertical farming

*  Water purification

*  New food manufacturing and production tech

*  Food security
 

 
Author's Bio

Charles (Chuck) Brooks serves as the Vice President for Government Relations & Marketing for Sutherland Global Services. Chuck also serves as Chairman of CompTIA’s New and Emerging Technology Committee, and he serves as subject Matter Expert to The Homeland Defense and Security Information Analysis Center (HDIAC), a Department of Defense (DOD sponsored organization through the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC). Chuck also served as a Technology Partner Advisor to The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. In government, he served at the Department of Homeland Security as the first Director of Legislative Affairs for the Science & Technology Directorate. Chuck also spent six years on Capitol Hill as a Senior Advisor to the late Senator Arlen Specter where he covered foreign affairs, business, and technology issues. In academia, Chuck was an Adjunct Faculty Member at Johns Hopkins University where he taught graduate level students about homeland security and Congress. He has an MA in International relations from the University of Chicago, and a BA in Political Science from DePauw University, and a Certificate in International Law from The Hague Academy of International Law. Chuck is widely published on the subjects of emerging technologies, cybersecurity, homeland security, innovation, public/private partnerships, and digital engagement.